The Last Supper

Stacy decided that she will be doing a Whole30 month starting Monday so we decided to break out the new deep fryer ($2 yard sale find) and cook some “fish and chips.”


Just like in the UK, only without the newspaper.

A deep fryer is a highly underrated tool. Fill with oil and cook almost anything. Got apples? Fry them. Got bacon? Fry it. Got any meat? Batter and then fry it. In this case we made the coating using an egg dip and a “flour” mixture that had coconut flour, black pepper, dill and parsley. We threw some roughy filets in this and fried them. It only took a few minutes and they were a perfect golden brown.

The chips we made were more like crisps (which, confusingly, are called chips in America) because we only had a few small new potatoes to do it with. We put them in the fryer for 8 minutes and they were ready as well. Caution: DO NOT OVERFILL YOUR FRY BASKET. This will cause oil explosion and the last thing you need is 375 degree oil going everywhere.

Fill line, fool. YOU SHALL NOT PASS!
This is your fill line. You may think it’s cute to go over the fill line. You are a fool. Don’t pass the fill line.

Go fries, go! Real french fries are a thousand times the food Ore Ida oven fries are. If you can avoid it, don’t buy frozen french fries.

Stacy also made this awesome caper dill dip, too (mayonnaise, chopped capers, dill, lemon juice). It was great on the fish, took some of the coconut flavor away from the “breading” but I even liked it with the chips too.

Overall, I think this is a successful meal. The fish ended up very soft, like biting into a pillow. The fries ended up deliciously crispy-salty like a proper fry. The kids ate the fish like it was potato chips and everyone got their fill. Once Stacy’s Whole30 is over, we’ll definitely be making sweet potatoes fries and lots of goodies fried in coconut oil!

About Matthew

Matthew McCarry has written 217 post in this blog.

Matt is the husband of Stacy and somehow manages to contribute to this blog in between taking care of three children, producing the Paleo View Podcast and cooking most of the food featured here.